上海龙凤

Engineers develop a new biosensor chip for detecting DNA mutations

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed an electrical graphene chip capable of detecting mutations in DNA. Researchers say the technology could one day be used in various medical applications

Discovery of gold nanocluster 'double' hints at other shape changing particles

Chemically the same, graphite and diamonds are as physically distinct as two minerals can be, one opaque and soft, the other translucent and hard. What makes them unique is their differing arrangement of carbon atoms

Nanosubs gain better fluorescent properties for tracking

The next generation of nanosubmarines being developed at Rice University has been upgraded with tags that fluoresce longer, which enables the submersibles to be tracked for greater periods while being driven through a solution

DNA shaping up to be ideal framework for rationally designed nanostructures

A cube, an octahedron, a prism—these are among the polyhedral structures, or frames, made of DNA that scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have designed to connect nanoparticles

Nano 'hall of mirrors' causes molecules to mix with light

When a molecule emits a blink of light, it doesn't expect it to ever come back. However researchers have now managed to place single molecules in such a tiny optical cavity that emitted photons, or particles of light, return

Researchers discover new way to turn electricity into light using graphene

When an airplane begins to move faster than the speed of sound, it creates a shockwave that produces a well-known "boom" of sound. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have discovered a similar process in a sheet of graphene

New nanomaterial offers promise in bendable, wearable electronic devices

An ultrathin film that is both transparent and highly conductive to electric current has been produced by a cheap and simple method devised by an international team of nanomaterials researchers from the University of Illinois

A chemically powered autonomous molecular nanomotor

Transparent, flexible supercapacitors pave the way for a multitude of applications,One of the biggest problems plaguing high-energy, lithium-metal batteries is dendrites, which form when some of the lithium from the electrode begins to branch outside the electrode and into the

Magnetically controlled battery could store energy for power grids

Scientists have built a battery containing a magnetic fluid that can be moved in any direction by applying a magnetic field. The magnetically controlled battery concept could be especially useful for flow batteries

Numerous materials with extreme magnetoresistance have been reported since the Cava lab first discovered extreme magnetoresistance (originally named 'large magnetoresistance' by Nature editors before the research field supplanted it with the current term) in WTe2 two years ago

But in particular, researchers in the Cava lab noticed that five materials with extreme magnetoresistance yet very different structures and chemical make-up all share the same characteristics when their resistance-temperature-applied-magnetic-field diagrams are measured. This diagram maps the temperature and magnetic field strength at which the material's magnetoresistance turns on and then saturates. Using the phase diagrams as a clue, scientists may be able to identify other materials with extreme magnetoresistance. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-06-underlying-diverse-materials-extreme-magnetoresistance.html#jCp

Detailed investigations by Fazel Tafti, a former Cava lab postdoc and physics PhD, revealed a common feature related to the materials' electronic structures, leading the researchers to propose a picture of the underlying physics that unifies these chemically disparate materials. This kind of research, where materials chemistry and materials physics meet, is what the Cava lab and its collaborators enjoy the most, Cava said Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-06-underlying-diverse-materials-extreme-magnetoresistance.html#jCp

"Now we hope that other people will think about this, and make more measurements to see whether our proposal for the unifying physics holds up to more intense scrutiny," Cava said. He was confident that first author Fazel Tafti, now an assistant professor of physics at Boston College, would get to the bottom of this phenomenon. "Physicists quest for truth," he said Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-06-underlying-diverse-materials-extreme-magnetoresistance.html#jCpe

Testimonials

Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn't anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary

Global climate change—likely triggered by massive volcanic eruptions—killed off more than 95 percent of all species about 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period. Land reptiles colonized the ocean in just 3.35 million years at the beginning of the Triassic, a speedy recovery in geologic time, the researchers report today (June 13) in the journal Scientific Report

Our results fit with the emerging view that the recovery was faster than previously thought," said study co-author Ryosuke Motani, professor of paleobiology at UC Davis' Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

The research was led by Wanlu Fu, now of the Laboratory of Orogenic Belt and Crustal Evolution at Peking University. Fu conducted the research while an in-residence doctoral student working with study co-author Isabel Montañez, professor of geochemistry at UC Davis. Co-authors include scientists from the University of Wisconsin and the University of Milan in Italy. The fossils and rock samples were collected from Majiashan in Chaohu, South China Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-06-marine-life-quickly-recovered-global.html#jCp

We attribute the biotic recovery and initiation of a new marine ecosystem to the final breakdown of this ocean stratification and the return to an oxygenated ocean," Montañez said Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-06-marine-life-quickly-recovered-global.html#jCp

The carbon isotopes varied on a timescale of 405,000 years and 100,000 years, the study reports. These carbon cycles correspond to Earth's orbital eccentricity, in which the Earth's orbit shifts from more circular to more elliptical and back. These orbital wobbles also provided a means to precisely date the first occurrence of Mesozoic marine reptiles Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-06-marine-life-quickly-recovered-global.html#jCp

As in the case of several recent food recalls, harmful pathogens are most often only discovered when people start getting sick. Researchers have been working to develop better biosensors that could quickly, accurately and automatically detect everything from cancer biomarkers in the blood to harmful bacteria in the environment. Even tiny amounts of pathogens can create serious health risks, but the available sensors are unable to quickly and easily detect these quantities